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Posts Tagged ‘agathachristie’

Overall November has been another good month despite some bad days at the end compounded by a resurgence of back trouble. This month’s miscellany is dominated by television (and quite a bit of it bad television at that!) but that is partly because I have hived off comments on other forms to separate blogs (‘Three Courtesans’ for example), partly because there have been quite a number of programmes which at least looked interesting and partly because the pressure of LINks work has restricted my reading and writing. (more…)

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Continuing with Caryl Churchill I reached Light Shining in Buckinghamshire (1977). I thought from the title that this was likely to be among  my favourite of Churchill’s plays and so it proved. Using her ensemble techniques she covers the radicalization, and then the confrontation with and suppression of the radicals, which occurred during the course of the English Revolution. (more…)

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J.I.M. Stewart – Myself and Michael Innes (1987)

This book is subtitled A Memoir, which is certainly a far more suitable description than auto-biography. Indeed it is short on some basic biographical facts which can more easily be picked up from Wikipedia. Stewart was born in 1906 in Edinburgh, where he attended the Edinburgh Academy, before moving on to Oriel College, Oxford. (more…)

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A documentary film first.  Afghan Star directed by Havana Marking, which won a prize at the 2009 Sundance Festival, told the extraordinary story of the introduction of an American Idol/X-Factor type show in Afghanistan. Music was banned by the Taliban and the producers of the show (Afghan Star) obviously faced considerable problems when they decided to try making an Afghan version. But it was a fantastic success with estimated figures of one-third of the Afghan population watching or voting via mobiles. (more…)

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Light on Christie

I attempt here to précis and comment on Alison Light’s brilliant and innovative analysis of Agatha Christie in her Forever England (Femininity, Literature and Conservatism Between the Wars: 1991) which was a group read for WWTTA in 2007 (yes it has taken me that long!). This analysis, which forms Chapter 2 of the book, is much the most interesting thing I have ever read on Christie and has led me to re-think many assumptions. The analysis is of Christie’s cultural, social and political position not of her as a mystery writer (which is a field that has received a certain amount of coverage).

Attempting a précis is no small matter as Light’s analysis is densely packed and closely argued. Anyone really interested is recommended to try and get hold of a copy of the book: unfortunately in the UK at least this is much easier said than done. I purchased my copy at an exorbitant price in Wigtownacouple of years ago, but that was cheap compared with on-line prices. (more…)

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