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Posts Tagged ‘byron’

The Struggles of Conscience forms one of that subset of The Tales concerned with the rise and fall of young men (other prominent examples include Tale 5, The Patron, Tale 11, Edward Shore and Tale 21, The Learned Boy). Although these tales are very different in their particular protagonists and their central issues, it is worth forming the connection, both because it raises questions around the autobiographical elements which may have worked their way, consciously or unconsciously, into such stories, but also because it is interesting to observe how Crabbe uses this particular narrative format to examine some of his major ideological, political and moral concerns. (more…)

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Byron and the Academy

The Newstead Abbey Byron Review is published annually, and consists mainly of papers which have been given at various Byron conferences in the preceding year, book reviews and a few pieces which appear to have been specially written for the Review. The 2010 edition contains quite a lot of interest to the Byron enthusiast. I was personally most taken by two pieces, one for positive and one for negative reasons. (more…)

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So I return to produce the first monthly miscellany since February. It is my intention under my new regime that these miscellanies will actually be shorter and I will have more individual entries. (more…)

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Dumbing-down : A Rant

Occasionally I feel in the need of a rant. Most recently my wrath has been incurred by a BBC4 Programme entitled In Their Own Words. I have decided to try to give my ire a more theoretical and, hopefully, objective framework by considering the topic of dumbing-down. (more…)

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Byron’s Religions

‘Byron’s Religions’ was the title of the 2010 one-day Conference of the Newstead Abbey Byron society held at Nottingham University on May 1st. (more…)

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I subscribe to the Byron Journal which is a bi-annual publication of The Byron Society. It is a somewhat strange mixture of extremely academic articles (especially most of the lengthy book review section), reports from various conferences and Byron societies around the world, and articles on various Byron related matters. (more…)

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I┬áre-read, with more concentration, Caryl Churchill’s Fen (1983). It is a remarkable piece of work mainly concerned with the lives of a number of women in a Fen village. There are a couple of male characters – Mr Tewson, the landowner, and Frank, for whom one of the women, Val, is leaving her husband and young daughters, but the play’s concern is with the women. (more…)

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