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Posts Tagged ‘eighteenthcentury’

September has been a very good month. A score of  7.07 on the Depression Scale which is the second highest ever and by far the best September. This may be partly because I am now marking more generously. (more…)

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In Chapter 5 of The Roots of Romanticism Isaiah Berlin considers what he terms ‘the final eruption of unbridled romanticism’. (more…)

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Writing about the work of Isaiah Berlin is an extremely difficult process. The thought is so diffuse (though only very rarely anything less than pellucid), the arguments so close, the range of reference so wide, and above all the generosity of spirit, the endless qualification and perception of alternative views, mean that any attempt at precis tends to the absurdly reductive; reduces a wealth of intellect and ideas to a poverty. Berlin is just a consistent delight – charming, entrancing, and always thought-provoking. (more…)

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4th July 2007

Continuing to watch Rome, the second series, and reading a lengthy discussion on ECW about classicism, I fell to musing on these topics. The problem with the discussion was the lack of definition of ‘classicism’. What do we mean by this? (more…)

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15th August 2007

Peter Linebaugh in The London Hanged (p14) writes…

>>new morality became triumphant among the capitalist class at the end of the seventeenth century. Christopher Hill contrasted it with the religious attitudes prevailing earlier: ‘Labour, the curse of fallen man, had become a religious duty, a means of glorifying God in our calling. Poverty had ceased to be a holy state and had become presumptive evidence of wickedness’.<< (more…)

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Walter Scott’s Tales of a Scottish Grandfather takes as a paratext the idea that he is explaining Scottish history to his grandson. In fact the degree to which Scott remembers this varies – he certainly slips in the odd reference to ‘your grandfather’ or ‘your grandfather’s grandfather’, but for the majority of the time it is clear that he is pursuing much larger ideological and political (and commercial, for we must never forget that where Scott is concerned – and these books, now almost forgotten even among the works of this most neglected of writers, were another big commercial success) goals. (more…)

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I have not written about the big D., my mood or what has been happening in my life for some months now. I was just preparing to do so at the very end of August and was ready to comment on how excellent July and August had been – the best August since my ‘mood records’ began in 2005 indeed – when I was struck down with a bout which is only now (late September) slowly passing. (more…)

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